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20130423
20130423
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)
know his brother, tamerlan, possibly made a couple of visits there, if that emerges, now that he has had his miranda rights, does the government have powers to go back in and start to interrogate him? >> yes. they have the power to do it. whether it would be a proper under the law, is an open question. they couldn't use any of the material that they illicited from him, but maybe they don't need it. they may also reindict him. >> well, they wouldn't use the inform in the criminal case against him but could use it to get to a wider group. >> oh no question. can you use it against anybody else. you only can't use it against this defendant. and they may be able to obtain such information. and if so, they might reindict him under the terrorist statute. it is a little odd that everybody regards this guy as a terrorist except the united states government. which has indicted him under ordinary murder statute that carries the death penalty. but often we see a second indictment following the first indictment, if more information comes forward. once he get's a lawyer and he says to his lawyer,
says he and his brother tamerlan -- he says brother tamerlan was the mastermind. tsarnaev's initial court appearance was today in his hospital room. he was able to speak one word, no, when asked if he could afford an attorney. he now has a public defender the court found today. he's alert, mentally competent and lucid. joining me is jake tapper live in boston. pretty dramatic developments late in the day here. from what we now believe, dzhokhar tsarnaev may have told the investigators in written answers, is that right? >> reporter: that's right. a u.s. government official tells me that according to these preliminary interviews, preliminary interviews with dzhokhar tsarnaev and the u.s. government is going to have to double back and check all of this information, but according to these preliminary interviews, what dzhokhar tsarnaev is conveying to investigators is the following. one, that there were not foreign terrorist groups involved in this terrorist plot, that it was just the two of them. two, that there was a real online component to this radicalization done through videos, wat
of tamerlan tsarnaev, after he spent six months in russia. senator diane feinstein, chairing the intelligence committee, said senior f.b.i. may testify tomorrow about why they did not pursue the matter further. i misspoke in that set-up piece. tsarnaev was read his miranda rights in his hospital room today. we're joined by a reporter who has been following developments closely. dina temple raston is npr as anti-terrorism correspondent. welcome to you. do we know how much or what investigators are learning from tsarnaev in the hospital so far? >> well, there's been very little that they've learnd because he can't really understand that he can't speak. he has a tube in his throat. he has some sort of a wound on his neck and his hand. apparently to his jaw. there's some question as to whether or not it was a self-inflicted wound. so as a result apparently they're writing notes back and forth. it's unclear if those notes are ra port building so he learns to trust these people who are trying to question him or where they're getting substantive information from him. >> brown: what can you tell us a
indicating his brother tamerlan was the mastermind behind the attack. he said their motivation was to protect islam and the two acted alone with no help from outside terror organizations. the criminal complaint outlines security video and photos, including this one, that shows the 19-year-old leaving his backpack along a metal barrier and using his cell phone. the complaint points out he alone appears calm in the chaos after the first blast. we're also hearing from swat team members. the officer that pulled him from the boat where he was in hiding. >> we wanted to get him in custody and have the situation come to an end for us, the families, the city. it needed to end. >> reporter: though there are still signs that tragedy is far from over. scars from the blast can still be seen along boylston street. today for the first time it's open to residents and business owners as they continue repairs. the public should be allowed back in the area soon. also this morning slain mit police officer sean collier was laid to rest. >> everybody is just going through the motions right now and pulling togethe
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)